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The Present Age: On the Death of Rebellion (Harper Perennial Modern Thought)

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en Limba Engleză Carte Paperback – 03 Aug 2010
“By far the most profound thinker of the 19th century.”
— Ludwig Wittgenstein

 
The Present Age is the stunningly prescient essay on the rise of mass media—particularly advertising, marketing, and publicity—by the great philosopher Søren Kierkegaard, the “father of existentialism.” With an introduction from celebrated philosopher Walter Kaufmann—who  states “those who would know Kierkegaard can do no better than to begin with this book”—The Present Age is an ideal introduction to one of the greatest thinkers in the history of western philosophy.
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Specificații

ISBN-13: 9780061990038
ISBN-10: 0061990035
Pagini: 128
Dimensiuni: 114 x 181 x 9 mm
Greutate: 0.11 kg
Editura: HARPERCOLLINS;
Colecția Harper Perennial Modern Classics
Seria Harper Perennial Modern Thought


Textul de pe ultima copertă

In his seminal 1846 tract The Present Age, Søren Kierkegaard ("the father of existentialism"—New York Times) analyzes the philosophical implications of a society dominated by mass media—a society eerily similar to our own. A stunningly prescient essay on the rising influence of advertising, marketing, and publicity, The Present Age is essential reading for anyone who wishes to better understand the modern world.

Recenzii

“Those who would know Kierkegaard can do no better than to begin with this book.... In The Present Age we find the heart of Kierkagaard.”
“The first important existentialist.”
The Present Age shows just how original Kierkegaard was. He brilliantly foresaw the dangers of the lack of commitment and responsiblity in the Public Sphere. When everything is up for endless detached critical comment as on blogs and cable news, action finally becomes impossible.”