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Language Evolution (Critical Concepts in Linguistics)

Editat de W. Tecumseh Fitch, Gesche Westphal Fitch
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en Limba Engleză Carte Hardback – 14 Feb 2012
This new four-volume collection, part of Routledge’s Critical Concepts in Linguistics series, assembles the most important scholarly writings concerning the biological evolution of language, particularly those incorporating a Darwinian view of evolution. Including excerpts from ancient sources such as the Bible, Plato, and Aristotle, along with classical sources like Condillac, Rousseau, and Herder, Language Evolution provides an overview of the intensive debate on language evolution following the publication of Darwin’s Origin of Species.
It also outlines each of the major conceptions of protolanguage and examines the evolution of our human capacity for speech, as well as focusing on the modern (mostly post-1990) literature attempting to reconcile the Chomskyean approach to linguistics with a Darwinian evolutionary viewpoint. In addition, it incorporates the new insights and approaches based on computer modelling, which have played a growing role in the recent literature.
This is an important resource for those scholars interested in possessing a deeper, historically informed overview of the immense literature on this topic. The collection will also, of course, provide unified and ready access to a selection of the most important papers from the 1990s onward. It is supplemented with a full index, and includes an introduction to each volume, newly written by the editors, which places the assembled materials in their historical and intellectual context.
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Specificații

ISBN-13: 9780415679152
ISBN-10: 041567915X
Pagini: 1704
Dimensiuni: 156 x 234 x 131 mm
Greutate: 3.40 kg
Editura: Taylor and Francis
Colecția Routledge
Seria Critical Concepts in Linguistics


Cuprins

vOLUME i
1. H. Aarsleff, ‘An Outline of Language-Origins Theory Since the Renaissance’, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1976, 280, 4ߝ13.
2. Aristotle, ‘Voice’ [c. 350 BC], The History of Animals, Bk. IV, Pt. 9, trans. D’Arcy Wentworth Thompson (Clarendon Press, 1910), pp. 109ߝ11.
3. É. B. d. Condillac, ‘The Origin and Progress of Language’, Essai sur l’origine des connaissances humaines [1747], trans. H. Aarsleff (Scholar’s Facsimiles and Reprints, 1971), pp. 113ߝ19.
4. J.-J. Rousseau, ‘Essay on the Origin of Language’, excerpt from On the Origin of Language, trans. John Moran and Alexander Gode (University of Chicago Press, 1966), pp. 5ߝ16.
5. J. G. Herder, ‘Essay on the Origin of Language’ [1772], excerpt from On the Origin of Language, trans. John Moran and Alexander Gode (University of Chicago Press, 1966), pp. 87ߝ128.
6. P. Camper, ‘Account of the Organs of Speech of the Orang Outang’, Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 1779, 69, 139ߝ59.
7. W. von Humboldt, ‘The Linguistics Process: Etymology and Morphology’ [1836], in Linguistic Variability and Intellectual Development (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1972), pp. 69ߝ78.
8. C. Darwin, ‘Difficulties on Theory’, On the Origin of Species, 6th edn. (John Murray, 1859), pp. 171ߝ206.
9. C. Darwin, ‘Instinct’, On the Origin of Species, 6th edn. (John Murray, 1859), pp. 207ߝ43.
10. C. Darwin, ‘Recapitulation and Conclusion’, On the Origin of Species, 6th edn. (John Murray, 1859), pp. 459ߝ90.
11. C. Darwin, ‘Secondary Sexual Characters of Mammals’, The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex, 2nd edn. (John Murray, 1874), pp. 525ߝ8.
12. C. Darwin, ‘Comparison of the Mental Powers of Man and the Lower Animals’, The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex, 2nd edn. (John Murray, 1874).
13. F. M. Müller, ‘The Theoretical Stage, and the Origin of Language’, Lectures on the Science of Language (Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts and Green, 1861), pp. 344ߝ94.
14. F. M. Müller, ‘Lectures on Mr Darwin’s Philosophy of Language’, Fraser’s Magazine, 1873, 7ߝ8.
15. F. M. Müller, ‘The Science of Language’, Nature, 1870, 1, 256ߝ9.
16. F. W. Farrar, ‘Philology and Darwinism’, Nature, 1870, 1, 527ߝ9.
17. F. W. Farrar, ‘On Language’, Language and Languages (Longmans, Green and Co., 1891), pp. 1ߝ47.
18. A. R. Wallace, ‘The Limits of Natural Selection as Applied to Man’, in Wallace (ed.), Contributions to the Theory of Natural Selection (Macmillan, 1871), pp. 332ߝ60.
19. A. R. Wallace, ‘Darwinism Applied to Man’ (extract), Darwinism: An Exposition of the Theory of Natural Selection with some of its Applications (Macmillan, 1889), pp. 461ߝ78.
20. E. L. Thorndike, ‘The Origin of Language’, Science, 1943, 98, 1ߝ6.
21. A. Montagu, ‘Toolmaking, Hunting and the Origin of Language’, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1976, 280, 266ߝ74.
Volume II
22. R. M. Yerkes and A. W. Yerkes, The Great Apes (Yale University Press, 1929), pp. 72ߝ9, 161ߝ5, 301ߝ9, 460ߝ6, 545ߝ6.
23. C. Hayes, The Ape in Our House (Harper, 1951), pp. 60ߝ71, 85ߝ91, 108ߝ10, 130ߝ40, 181ߝ9, 224ߝ31, 239ߝ43.
24. J. Goodall, ‘Communication’, The Chimpanzees of Gombe (Harvard University Press, 1986), pp. 114ߝ43.
25. E. S. Savage-Rumbaugh, J. Murphy, R. A. Sevcik, K. E. Brakke, S. L. Williams, and D. M. Rumbaugh, ‘Language Comprehension in Ape and Child’, Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 1993, 158, 44ߝ5, 98ߝ103.
26. E. S. Savage-Rumbaugh, D. M. Rumbaugh, S. T. Smith, and J. Lawson, ‘Reference: The Linguistic Essential’, Science, 1980, 210, 922ߝ5.
27. K. Zuberbühler, ‘Referential Labelling in Wild Diana Monkeys’, Animal Behaviour, 2000, 59, 917ߝ27.
28. R. M. Seyfarth, D. L. Cheney, and T. J. Bergman, ‘Primate Social Cognition and the Origins of Language’, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 2005, 9, 264ߝ6.
29. R. M. Seyfarth and D. L. Cheney, ‘Signalers and Receivers in Animal Communication’, Annual Review of Psychology, 2003, 54, 145ߝ73.
30. P. H. Lieberman, D. Klatt, and W. H. Wilson, ‘Vocal Tract Limitations on the Vowel Repertoires of Rhesus Monkey and Other Nonhuman Primates’, Science, 1969, 64, 1185ߝ7.
31. P. Lieberman, ‘The Evolution of Human Speech’, The Biology and Evolution of Language (Harvard University Press, 1984), pp. 256ߝ86.
32. P. Lieberman, ‘Conclusion: On the Nature and Evolution of the Biological Bases of Language’, The Biology and Evolution of Language (Harvard University Press, 1984), pp. 330ߝ4.
33. B. Arensburg, L. A. Schepartz, A. M. Tillier, B. Vandermeersch, and Y. Rak, ‘A Reappraisal of the Anatomical Basis for Speech in Middle Paleolithic Hominids’, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1990, 83, 137ߝ46.
34. A. M. MacLarnon and G. P. Hewitt, ‘The Evolution of Human Speech: The Role of Enhanced Breathing Control’, American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 1999, 109, 341ߝ63.
35. W. T. Fitch, ‘The Evolution of Speech: A Comparative Review’, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 2000, 4, 258ߝ67.
36. W. T. Fitch and D. Reby, ‘The Descended Larynx is not Uniquely Human’, Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 2001, 268, 1669ߝ75.
37. T. Nishimura, A. Mikami, J. Suzuki, and T. Matsuzawa, ‘Descent of the Larynx in Chimpanzee Infants’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2003, 100, 6930ߝ3.
38. R. F. Kay, M. Cartmill, and M. Balow, ‘The Hypoglossal Canal and the Origin of Human Vocal Behavior’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1998, 95, 5417ߝ19.
39. D. DeGusta, W. H. Gilbert, and S. P. Turner, ‘Hypoglossal Canal Size and Hominid Speech’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1999, 96, 1800ߝ4.
40. W. J. Jungers, A. A. Pokempner, R. F. Kay, and M. Cartmill, ‘Hypoglossal Canal Size in Living Hominoids and the Evolution of Human Speech’, Human Biology, 2003, 75, 473ߝ84.
41. R. L. Holloway, ‘Human Paleontological Evidence Relevant to Language Behavior’, Human Neurobiology, 1983, 2, 105ߝ14.
42. D. Falk, ‘Cerebral Cortices of East African Early Hominids’, Science, 1983, 221, 1072ߝ4.
43. R. Myers, ‘Comparative Neurology of Vocalization and Speech: Proof of a Dichotomy’, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1976, 280, 745ߝ57.
44. U. Jürgens, ‘Neuronal Control of Mammalian Vocalization, With Special Reference to the Squirrel Monkey’, Naturwissenschaften, 1998, 85, 376ߝ88.
45. T. W. Deacon, ‘The Neural Circuitry Underlying Primate Calls and Human Language’, in J. Wind, B. A. Chiarelli, B. Bichakjian, and A. Nocentini (eds.), Language Origins: A Multidisciplinary Approach (Kluwer, 1992), pp. 121ߝ62.
46. P. F. MacNeilage and B. L. Davis, ‘On the Origin of Internal Structure of Word Forms’, Science, 2000, 288, 527ߝ31.
47. P. F. MacNeilage, ‘The Frame/Content Theory of Evolution of Speech Production’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1998, 21, 4, 499ߝ511.
48. U. Jürgens, ‘Speech Evolved from Vocalization not Mastication’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1998, 21, 4, 519ߝ20.
49. R. J. Andrew, ‘Cyclicity in Speech Derived from Call Repetition Rather than from Intrinsic Cyclicity of Ingestion’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1998, 21, 4, 513ߝ14.
50. M. Studdert-Kennedy, ‘The Particulate Origins of Language Generativity: From Syllable to Gesture’, in J. R. Hurford, M. Studdert-Kennedy, and C. Knight (eds.), Approaches to the Evolution of Language (Cambridge University Press, 1998), pp. 202ߝ21.
Volume III
51. C. F. Hockett and R. Ascher, ‘The Human Revolution’, Current Anthropology, 1964, 5, 135ߝ47.
52. W. H. Zuidema, ‘The Evolutionary Biology of Language’, The Major Transitions in the Evolution of Language (University of Edinburgh Press, 2005), pp. 9ߝ45.
53. R. Jackendoff, ‘Possible Stages in the Evolution of the Language Capacity’, Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 1999, 3, 272ߝ9.
54. D. Bickerton, ‘The Fossils of Language’, Language and Species (Chicago University Press, 1990), pp. 105ߝ29.
55. T. W. Deacon, ‘Symbols Aren’t Simple’, The Symbolic Species: The Co-evolution of Language and the Brain (W. W. Norton, 1997), pp. 69ߝ101.
56. T. W. Deacon, ‘The Talking Brain’, The Symbolic Species: The Co-evolution of Language and the Brain (W. W. Norton, 1997), pp. 225ߝ53.
57. O. Jespersen, ‘The Origin of Speech’, Language: Its Nature, Development and Origin (W. W. Norton & Co., 1922), pp. 412ߝ42.
58. F. B. Livingstone, ‘Did the Australopithecines Sing?’, Current Anthropology, 1973, 14, 25ߝ9.
59. F. Nottebohm, ‘Vocal Tract and Brain: A Search for Evolutionary Bottlenecks’, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1976, 280, 643ߝ9.
60. B. Richman, ‘On the Evolution of Speech: Singing as the Middle Term’, Current Anthropology, 1993, 34, 721ߝ2.
61. G. W. Hewes, ‘Primate Communication and the Gestural Origin of Language’, Current Anthropology, 1973, 14, 5ߝ24.
62. G. Rizzolatti and M. A. Arbib, ‘Language Within Our Grasp’, Trends in Neuroscience, 1998, 21, 188ߝ94.
63. M. A. Arbib, ‘From Monkey-like Action Recognition to Human Language: An Evolutionary Framework for Neurolinguistics’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 2005, 28, 105ߝ24, 159ߝ67.
64. L. C. Aiello and R. I. M. Dunbar, ‘Neocortex Size, Group Size, and the Evolution of Language’, Current Anthropology, 1993, 34, 184ߝ93.
65. R. I. M. Dunbar, ‘Coevolution of Neocortical Size, Group Size and Language in Humans’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1993, 16, 4, 681ߝ94, 729ߝ35.
66. M. Donald, ‘Do Grooming and Speech Really Serve Homologous Functions?’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1993, 16, 4, 700ߝ1.
67. R. M. Seyfarth and D. L. Cheney, ‘Grooming is Not the Only Regulator of Primate Social Functions’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1993, 16, 4, 717ߝ18.
68. T. W. Deacon, ‘Confounded Correlations, Again’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1993, 16, 4, 698ߝ9.
69. R. L. Holloway, ‘Another Primate Brain Fiction: Brain (Cortex) Weight and Homogeneity’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1993, 16, 4, 707ߝ8.
Volume IV
70. B. F. Skinner, ‘The Verbal; Community’, Verbal Behavior (Appleton-Century-Crofts, 1957), pp. 461ߝ70.
71. N. Chomsky, ‘Biolinguistics and the Human Capacity’, Language and Mind (Cambridge University Press, 2006), pp. 173ߝ85.
72. N. Chomsky, ‘On the Nature of Language’, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1976, 280, 46ߝ7, 57.
73. N. Chomsky, Language and Problems of Knowledge (MIT Press, 1988), pp. 166ߝ70, 182ߝ4.
74. N. Chomsky, Reflections on Language (Random House, 1975), pp. 58ߝ9.
75. S. J. Gould, ‘Exaptation: A Crucial Tool for Evolutionary Psychology’, Journal of Social Issues, 1991, 47, 3, 43ߝ65.
76. J. Hurford, ‘Nativist and Functional Explanations in Language Acquisition’, in I. M. Roca (ed.), Logical Issues in Language Acquisition (Foris Publications, 1990), pp. 85ߝ136.
77. S. Pinker and P. Bloom, ‘Natural Language and Natural Selection’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1990, 13, 707ߝ27.
78. F. J. Newmeyer, ‘On the Supposed "Counterfunctionality" of Universal Grammar: Some Evolutionary Implications’, in J. R. Hurford, M. Studdert-Kennedy, and C. Knight (eds.), Approaches to the Evolution of Language (Cambridge University Press, 1988), pp. 305ߝ19.
79. M. Donald, ‘Précis of Origins of the Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture and Cognition’, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1993, 16, 737ߝ48.
80. S. Kirby, ‘Spontaneous Evolution of Linguistic Structure: An Iterated Learning Model of the Emergence of Regularity and Irregularity’, IEEE Transactions on Evolutionary Computation, 2001, 5, 2, 102ߝ10.
81. J. Batali, ‘Computer Simulations of the Emergence of Grammar’, in J. R. Hurford, M. Studdert-Kennedy, and C. Knight (eds.), Approaches to the Evolution of Language (Cambridge University Press, 1988), pp. 405ߝ26.
82. M. A. Nowak and D. C. Krakauer, ‘The Evolution of Language’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1999, 96, 8028ߝ33.
83. M. Nowak, N. L. Komarova, and P. Niyogi, ‘Evolution of Universal Grammar’, Science, 2001, 291, 114ߝ18.
84. M. Hauser, N. Chomsky, and W. T. Fitch, ‘The Language Faculty: What is It, Who Has It, and How Did It Evolve?’, Science, 2002, 298, 1569ߝ79.
85. S. Pinker and R. Jackendoff, ‘The Faculty of Language: What’s Special About It?’, Cognition, 2005, 95, 201ߝ36.
86. W. T. Fitch, M. D. Hauser, and N. Chomsky, ‘The Evolution of the Language Faculty: Clarifications and Implications’, Cognition, 2005, 97, 179ߝ210.