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Signs Amid the Rubble: The Purposes of God in Human History

De (autor) Editat de Geoffrey Wainwright
Notă GoodReads:
en Limba Engleză Paperback – February 2003
The late Lesslie Newbigin was widely regarded as one of this generation's most significant voices on Christianity in relation to modern society. Now that he is gone, there is a call for his unpublished writings to be made available. To that end "Signs amid the Rubble" gathers some of Newbigin's finest statements on issues of continuing relevance. The first set of chapters consists of the 1941 Bangalore Lectures, in which Newbigin speaks powerfully of the kingdom of God in relation to the modern - severely deficient - idea of "progress." The second group of writings, the Henry Martyn Lectures of 1986, deals mainly with the importance of Christian mission. In the last piece, his address to the World Council of Churches conference on mission and evangelism in Brazil in 1996 - which editor Geoffrey Wainwright calls his "swan song on the ecumenical stage" - Newbigin wonders aloud how future generations will judge today's practice of abortion.
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Specificații

ISBN-13: 9780802809896
ISBN-10: 0802809898
Pagini: 121
Dimensiuni: 153 x 229 x 11 mm
Greutate: 0.2 kg
Editura: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company
Locul publicării: United States

Textul de pe ultima copertă

The late Lesslie Newbigin was widely regarded as one of this generation'smost significant voices on Christianity in relation to modern society. Nowthat he is gone, there is a call for his unpublished writings to be madeavailable. To that end "Signs amid the Rubble gathers some of Newbigin'sfinest statements on issues of continuing relevance.

The first set of chapters consists of the 1941Bangalore Lectures, in which Newbigin speaks powerfully of the kingdomof God in relation to the modern -- severely deficient -- idea of "progress." The second group of writings, the Henry Martyn Lectures of 1986, deals mainly with the importance of Christian mission. In the last piece, his address to the World Council of Churches conference on mission andevangelism in Brazil in 1996 -- which editor Geoffrey Wainwright calls his "swan song on the ecumenical stage" -- Newbigin wondersaloud how future generations will judge today's practice of abortion.