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The Daydreamer (Reclam Universal-Bibliothek, nr. 9119)

De (autor) Editat de Hans-Christian Oeser
Notă GoodReads:
en Limba Engleză Carte Paperback – October 2004
Zu Ian McEwans großen literarischen Qualitäten zählt sein hohes Einfühlungsvermögen in die Psyche von Kindern und Jugendlichen. Davon legt auch 'The Daydreamer' Zeugnis ab: Der zehnjährige Peter Fortune, "a difficult child", lebt in einer Welt der Fantasie; er besitzt die Gabe, sich und seine Umgebung zu verwandeln, was zu den abenteuerlichsten Verstrickungen führt...Ungekürzte und unbearbeitete Textausgabe in der Originalsprache, mit Übersetzungen schwieriger Wörter am Fuß jeder Seite, Nachwort und Literaturhinweisen.
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  Reclam Philipp Jun. – October 2004 3327 lei  Economic 10-16 zile +257 lei  6-13 zile
  Random House – 07 Sep 1995 3635 lei  Economic 2-4 săpt. +590 lei  3-7 zile
  Vintage Publishing – September 1995 4611 lei  Economic 2-4 săpt. +811 lei  3-7 zile
  Anchor Books – 2000 7502 lei  Economic 2-4 săpt. +576 lei  9-16 zile

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Specificații

ISBN-13: 9783150091197
ISBN-10: 3150091195
Pagini: 159
Dimensiuni: 98 x 150 x 10 mm
Greutate: 0.09 kg
Editura: Reclam Philipp Jun.
Seriile Reclam Universal-Bibliothek , Fremdsprachentexte


Recenzii

"A brilliant book - wonderful" TES "A classic" Financial Times "Exhilarating - briliant" Independent "Clear and vivid prose ... Read these aloud to your children and be unsettled by them" -- Katie Law Evening Standard 20050214 "This is a book that could be read at several levels. The dreams can be taken at face-value, but they also reveal themes that more astute readers might recognise ... A good read" Writeaway! 20050330

Notă biografică

Ian McEwan is the bestselling author of more than ten books, including the novels The Comfort of Strangers and Black Dogs, both shortlisted for the Booker Prize, Amsterdam, winner of the Booker Prize, and The Child in Time, winner of the Whitbread Award, as well as the story collections First Love, Last Rites, winner of the Somerset Maugham Award, and In Between the Sheets. He has also written screenplays, plays, television scripts, a children’s book, and the libretto for an oratorio. He lives in London.

Extras

As each chapter of The Daydreamer was completed, I read it aloud to my children.  The arrangement was simple.  They got the latest installment of what we called the 'Peter stories', and I took away some useful editorial content.  This pleasant, almost ritualistic exchange in turn affected the writing itself, in that I became more than usually attentive to the sound of an adult voice speaking each sentence.  This adult was not, or not simply, me.  Alone in my study, I read aloud passages to an imaginary child (not quite, or not only, one of mine) on behalf of this imaginary adult.  Ear and tongue, I wanted to please them both.

The child's needs I thought I knew instinctively: a good tale above all, a sympathetic hero, villains yes, but not all the time because they are too simplifying, clarity in openings, twists in the middle, and satisfying outcomes that were not always happy.  For the adult I felt little more than vague sympathy.  We all love the idea of bedtime stories -- the fresh minted breath, the wide and trustful eyes, the hot water bottle baking down among the clean linen, the sleepy glowing covenant -- and who would not have the scene carved upon his headstone?  But do adults really like children's literature?  I've always thought the entusiasm was a little overstated, even desperate.  'Swallows and Amazons? Beatrix Potter? Marvellous books!'  Do we really mean it, do we really still enjoy them, or are we speaking up for, and keeping the lines open to, our lost, nearly forgotten selves?  When exactly did you last curl up alone with The Swiss Family Robinson?

What we like about children's books is our children's pleasure in them, and this is less to do with literature and more to do with love.  Early on in writing and reading aloud The Daydreamer I began to think it might be better to forget about our mighty tradition of children's literature and to write a book for adults about a child in a language that children could understand.  In the century of Hemingway and Calvino simple prose need not deter the sophisticated reader.  I hoped the subject matter -- the imagination itself -- was one in which anyone who picks up a book has a stake.  Similarly, transformation has been a theme, almost an obsession, in all literatures.  The Daydreamer was published in an illustrated edition for children in Britain and the United States, and in a more sober adult form in various other countries.  There was once a tradition by which authors dedicate their books to the fates, rather in the manner of a parent sending a child out into the world. 'Goe littel booke...'  this one may well settle down after all for a quiet life in a corner of a children's library, or die in oblivion, but for the moment I'm still hoping it might give some pleasure all round.

Ian McEwan
1995

Textul de pe ultima copertă

From award-winning master Ian McEwan comes an enchanting work of fiction that appeals equally to adults and children. In these seven exquisite, interlinked episodes, grownup Peter Fortune reveals the secret journeys, metamorphoses, and adventures of his childhood.

Living somewhere between dream and reality, Peter experiences fantastical transformations: he swaps bodies with the family cat and a cranky infant, battles a very bad doll who comes to life to seek revenge, and discovers in a kitchen drawer some vanishing cream that actually makes people vanish. In the final story, he wakes up as an eleven-year-old inside a grownup's body, and embarks on the truly fantastic adventure of falling in love. Moving, dreamlike, and extraordinary, The Daydreamer is a celebration of imagination and fantasy.