Cantitate/Preț
Produs

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Collins Classics

Autor Mark Twain
en Limba Engleză Paperback – 14 iun 2018
HarperCollins is proud to present its incredible range of best-loved, essential classics.
Citește tot Restrânge

Toate formatele și edițiile

Toate formatele și edițiile Preț Express
Paperback (47) 2970 lei  3-5 săpt.
  Bantam Classics – 1995 2970 lei  3-5 săpt.
  Arcturus Publishing – 15 ian 2018 3063 lei  3-5 săpt. +790 lei  4-10 zile
  Dover Publications Inc. – 27 apr 2018 3296 lei  3-5 săpt. +871 lei  4-10 zile
  Oxford University Press – 12 iun 2008 3654 lei  3-5 săpt. +2337 lei  4-10 zile
  Random House UK – 6 sep 2012 3655 lei  3-5 săpt. +872 lei  4-10 zile
  HarperCollins Publishers – 14 iun 2018 4181 lei  3-5 săpt. +715 lei  4-10 zile
  UNION SQUARE & CO – 17 aug 2023 4225 lei  3-5 săpt. +872 lei  4-10 zile
  Vintage Publishing – apr 2010 4740 lei  3-5 săpt. +672 lei  4-10 zile
  Penguin Books – 7 aug 2008 4794 lei  3-5 săpt. +872 lei  4-10 zile
  Pearson Education – apr 2008 5036 lei  3-5 săpt. +264 lei  4-10 zile
  Penguin Books – 27 noi 2014 5051 lei  3-5 săpt. +1073 lei  4-10 zile
  Klett Sprachen GmbH – 13 noi 2020 5245 lei  17-23 zile +525 lei  4-10 zile
  Vintage Books USA – apr 2010 6330 lei  17-23 zile +588 lei  4-10 zile
  CANTERBURY CLASSICS – 28 noi 2019 6599 lei  3-5 săpt. +1223 lei  4-10 zile
  Klett Sprachen GmbH – 6 iun 2023 7185 lei  17-23 zile +718 lei  4-10 zile
  UNION SQUARE & CO – 5 aug 2016 11817 lei  3-5 săpt. +1522 lei  4-10 zile
  LIGHTNING SOURCE INC – 19 sep 2018 7284 lei  17-23 zile
  LIGHTNING SOURCE INC – 12 oct 2018 8008 lei  17-23 zile
  10467 lei  38-44 zile
  Independent Publishing – 6 sep 2013 10534 lei  38-44 zile
  Blurb – 2 oct 2019 10554 lei  38-44 zile
  Piccadilly Books – noi 2009 11604 lei  38-44 zile
  Rupa Publications India Pvt Ltd. – 5 iun 2023 11683 lei  38-44 zile
  Stonewell Press – 19 oct 2013 11813 lei  38-44 zile
  COSIMO CLASSICS – 9 noi 2020 11856 lei  38-44 zile
  New Millennium Library – 11941 lei  38-44 zile
  Intell World Publishers – 14 sep 2022 12572 lei  38-44 zile
  Maple Press – 2014 12660 lei  38-44 zile
  Les prairies numériques – 23 iul 2020 12729 lei  38-44 zile
  Simon & Brown – sep 2010 12878 lei  38-44 zile
  Delhi Open Books – 20 sep 2020 13247 lei  38-44 zile
  DIGITAL SCANNING INC – 9 sep 2009 13249 lei  38-44 zile
  Lulu.Com – 2 feb 2020 13637 lei  38-44 zile
  Rupa Publications – dec 2012 13911 lei  38-44 zile
  Devoted Publishing – 27 noi 2016 14144 lei  38-44 zile
  Hansebooks – mar 2019 14186 lei  38-44 zile
  1st World Library – iul 2013 14380 lei  38-44 zile
  14561 lei  17-23 zile
  Simon & Brown – 22 noi 2018 14838 lei  38-44 zile
  Lulu.Com – 3 feb 2020 16124 lei  38-44 zile
  Sanage Publishing House – 7 ian 2021 16246 lei  38-44 zile
  Vero Verlag – 11 noi 2019 17941 lei  38-44 zile
  Hazen Press – 7 oct 2008 18370 lei  38-44 zile
  Book Jungle – 14 mar 2009 20013 lei  38-44 zile
  Mill Press – 25 aug 2008 20498 lei  38-44 zile
  Book Jungle – 8 iun 2009 24471 lei  38-44 zile
  OXFORD CHILDRENS – 6 aug 2024 7094 lei  Precomandă
Hardback (5) 3480 lei  3-5 săpt. +3597 lei  4-10 zile
  Pan Macmillan – 18 mai 2017 3480 lei  3-5 săpt. +3597 lei  4-10 zile
  Flame Tree Publishing – 15 sep 2020 5315 lei  3-5 săpt. +696 lei  4-10 zile
  Suzeteo Enterprises – 18 iul 2019 16995 lei  38-44 zile
  Simon & Brown – 22 noi 2018 20179 lei  38-44 zile
  1st World Library – iul 2013 25901 lei  38-44 zile

Din seria Collins Classics

Preț: 4181 lei

Puncte Express: 63

Preț estimativ în valută:
800 866$ 684£

Carte disponibilă

Livrare economică 19 martie-02 aprilie
Livrare express 02-08 martie pentru 1714 lei

Preluare comenzi: 021 569.72.76

Specificații

ISBN-13: 9780008296469
ISBN-10: 0008296464
Pagini: 288
Dimensiuni: 131 x 198 x 22 mm
Greutate: 0.19 kg
Ediția:edition
Editura: HarperCollins Publishers
Colecția Collins Classics
Seria Collins Classics


Notă biografică


Extras

Chapter 1

"Tom!"

No answer.

"Tom!"

No answer.

"What's gone with that boy, I wonder? You TOM!"

No answer.

The old lady pulled her spectacles down and looked over them, about the room; then she put them up and looked out under them. She seldom or never looked through them for so small a thing as a boy; they were her state pair, the pride of her heart, and were built for "style," not service;-she could have seen through a pair of stove lids just as well. She looked perplexed for a moment, and then said, not fiercely, but still loud enough for the furniture to hear:

"Well, I lay if I get hold of you I'll-"

She did not finish, for by this time she was bending down and punching under the bed with the broom-and so she needed breath to punctuate the punches with. She resurrected nothing but the cat.

"I never did see the beat of that boy!"

She went to the open door and stood in it and looked out among the tomato vines and "jimpson" weeds that constituted the garden. No Tom. So she lifted up her voice, at an angle calculated for distance, and shouted:

"Y-o-u-u Tom!"

There was a slight noise behind her and she turned just in time to seize a small boy by the slack of his roundabout and arrest his flight.

"There! I might 'a' thought of that closet. What you been doing in there?"

"Nothing."

"Nothing! Look at your hands. And look at your mouth. What is that truck?"

"I don't know, aunt."

"Well I know. It's jam-that's what it is. Forty times I've said if you didn't let that jam alone I'd skin you. Hand me that switch."

The switch hovered in the air-the peril was desperate-

"My! Look behind you, aunt!"

The old lady whirled around, and snatched her skirts out of danger. The lad fled, on the instant, scrambled up the high board fence, and disappeared over it.

His aunt Polly stood surprised a moment, and then broke into a gentle laugh.

"Hang the boy, can't I never learn anything? Ain't he played me tricks enough like that for me to be looking out for him

by this time? But old fools is

the biggest fools there is. Can't learn an old dog new tricks, as the saying is. But my goodness, he never plays them alike, two days, and how is a body to know what's coming? He 'pears to know just how long he can torment me before I get my dander up, and he knows if he can make out to put me off for a minute or make me laugh, it's all down again and I can't hit him a lick. I ain't doing my duty by that boy, and that's the Lord's truth, goodness knows. Spare the rod and spile the child, as the Good Book says. I'm a-laying up sin and suffering for us both, I know. He's full of the Old Scratch, but laws-a-me! he's my own dead sister's boy, poor thing, and I ain't got the heart to lash him, somehow. Every time I let him off my conscience does hurt me so, and every time I hit him my old heart most breaks. Well-a-well, man that is born of woman is of few days and full of trouble, as the Scripture says, and I reckon it's so. He'll play hookey this evening,* and I'll just be obleeged to make him work, to-morrow, to punish him. It's mighty hard to make him work Saturdays, when all the boys is having holiday, but he hates work more than he hates anything else, and I've got to do some of my duty by him, or I'll be the ruination of the child."

Tom did play hookey, and he had a very good time. He got back home barely in season to help Jim, the small colored boy, saw next day's wood and split the kindlings, before supper-at least he was there in time to tell his adventures to Jim while Jim did three-fourths of the work. Tom's younger brother, (or rather, half-brother) Sid, was already through with his part of the work (picking up chips,) for he was a quiet boy and had no adventurous, troublesome ways.

While Tom was eating his supper, and stealing sugar as opportunity offered, aunt Polly asked him questions that were full of guile, and very deep-for she wanted to trap him into damaging revealments. Like many other simple-hearted souls, it was her pet vanity to believe she was endowed with a talent for dark and mysterious diplomacy and she loved to contemplate her most transparent devices as marvels of low cunning. Said she:

"Tom, it was middling warm in school, warn't it?"

"Yes'm."

"Powerful warm, warn't it?"

"Yes'm."

"Didn't you want to go in a-swimming, Tom?"

A bit of a scare shot through Tom-a touch of uncomfortable suspicion. He searched aunt Polly's face, but it told him nothing. So he said:

"No'm-well, not very much."

The old lady reached out her hand and felt Tom's shirt, and said:

"But you ain't too warm now, though." And it flattered her to reflect that she had discovered that the shirt was dry without anybody knowing that that was what she had in her mind. But in spite of her, Tom knew where the wind lay, now. So he forestalled what might be the next move:

"Some of us pumped on our heads-mine's damp yet. See?"

Aunt Polly was vexed to think she had overlooked that bit of circumstantial evidence, and missed a trick. Then she had a new inspiration:

"Tom, you didn't have to undo your shirt collar where I sewed it to pump on your head, did you? Unbutton your jacket!"

The trouble vanished out of Tom's face. He opened his jacket. His shirt collar was securely sewed.

"Bother! Well, go 'long with you. I'd made sure you'd played hookey and been a-swimming. But I forgive ye, Tom. I reckon you're a kind of a singed cat, as the saying is-better'n you look. This time."

She was half sorry her sagacity had miscarried, and half glad that Tom had stumbled into obedient conduct for once.

But Sidney said:

"Well, now, if I didn't think you sewed his collar with white thread, but it's black."

"Why, I did sew it with white! Tom!"

But Tom did not wait for the rest. As he went out at the door he said:

"Siddy, I'll lick you for that."

In a safe place Tom examined two large needles which were thrust into the lappels of his jacket, and had thread bound about them-one needle carried white thread and the other black. He said:

"She'd never noticed, if it hadn't been for Sid. Consound it! sometimes she sews it with white and sometimes she sews it with black. I wish to geeminy she'd stick to one or t'other-I can't keep the run of 'em. But I bet you I'll lam Sid for that. I'll learn him!"

He was not the Model Boy of the village. He knew the model boy very well though-and loathed him.

Within two minutes, or even less, he had forgotten all his troubles. Not because his troubles were one whit less heavy and bitter to him than a man's are to a man, but because a new and powerful interest bore them down and drove them out of his mind for the time-just as men's misfortunes are forgotten in the excitement of new enterprises. This new interest was a valued novelty in whistling, which he had just acquired from a negro, and he was suffering to practice it undisturbed. It consisted in a peculiar bird-like turn, a sort of liquid warble, produced by touching the tongue to the roof of the mouth at short intervals in the midst of the music-the reader probably remembers how to do it if he has ever been a boy. Diligence and attention soon gave him the knack of it, and he strode down the street with his mouth full of harmony and his soul full of gratitude. He felt much as an astronomer feels who has discovered a new planet. No doubt, as far as strong, deep, unalloyed pleasure is concerned, the advantage was with the boy, not the astronomer.

The summer evenings were long. It was not dark, yet. Presently Tom checked his whistle. A stranger was before him-a boy a shade larger than himself. A new-comer of any age or either sex was an impressive curiosity in the poor little shabby village of St. Petersburg. This boy was well dressed, too-well dressed on a week-day. This was simply astounding. His cap was a dainty thing, his close-buttoned blue cloth roundabout was new and natty, and so were his pantaloons. He had shoes on-and yet it was only Friday. He even wore a necktie, a bright bit of ribbon. He had a citified air about him that ate into Tom's vitals. The more Tom stared at the splendid marvel, the higher he turned up his nose at his finery and the shabbier and shabbier his own outfit seemed to him to grow. Neither boy spoke. If one moved, the other moved-but only sidewise, in a circle; they kept face to face and eye to eye all the time. Finally Tom said:

"I can lick you!"

"I'd like to see you try it."

"Well, I can do it."

"No you can't, either."

"Yes I can."

"No you can't."

"I can."

"You can't."

"Can!"

"Can't!"

An uncomfortable pause. Then Tom said:

"What's your name?"

"Tisn't any of your business, maybe."

"Well I 'low I'll make it my business."

"Well why don't you?"

"If you say much I will."

"Much-much-much! There now."

"Oh, you think you're mighty smart, don't you? I could lick you with one hand tied behind me, if I wanted to."

"Well why don't you do it? You say you can do it."

"Well I will, if you fool with me."

"Oh yes-I've seen whole families in the same fix."

"Smarty! You think you're some, now, don't you? Oh what a hat!"

"You can lump that hat if you don't like it. I dare you to knock it off-and anybody that'll take a dare will suck eggs."

"You're a liar!"

"You're another."

"You're a fighting liar and dasn't take it up."

"Aw-take a walk!"

"Say-if you gimme much more of your sass I'll take and bounce a rock off'n your head."

"Oh, of course you will."

"Well I will."

"Well why don't you do it then? What do you keep saying you will, for? Why don't you do it? It's because you're afraid."

"I ain't afraid."

"You are."

"I ain't."

"You are."

Another pause, and more eyeing and sidling around each other. Presently they were shoulder to shoulder. Tom said:

"Get away from here!"

"Get away yourself!"

"I won't."

"I won't either."

So they stood, each with a foot placed at an angle as a brace, and both shoving with might and main, and glowering at each other with hate. But neither could get an advantage. After struggling till both were hot and flushed, each relaxed his strain with watchful caution, and Tom said:

"You're a coward and a pup. I'll tell my big brother on you, and he can thrash you with his little finger, and I'll make him do it, too."

"What do I care for your big brother? I've got a brother that's bigger than he is-and what's more, he can throw him over that fence, too." [Both brothers were imaginary.]

"That's a lie."

"Your saying so don't make it so."

Tom drew a line in the dust with his big toe, and said:

"I dare you to step over that, and I'll lick you till you can't stand up. Anybody that'll take a dare will steal a sheep."

The new boy stepped over promptly, and said:

"Now you said you'd do it, now let's see you do it."

"Don't you crowd me, now; you better look out."

"Well you said you'd do it-why don't you do it?"

"By jingo! for two cents I will do it."

The new boy took two broad coppers out of his pocket and held them out with derision. Tom struck them to the ground. In an instant both boys were rolling and tumbling in the dirt, gripped together like cats; and for the space of a minute they tugged and tore at each other's hair and clothes, punched and scratched each other's noses, and covered themselves with dust and glory. Presently the confusion took form, and through the fog of battle Tom appeared, seated astride the new boy and pounding him with his fists.

"Holler 'nuff!" said he.

The boy only struggled to free himself. He was crying,-mainly from rage.

"Holler 'nuff!"-and the pounding went on.

At last the stranger got out a smothered "'Nuff!" and Tom let him up and said:

"Now that'll learn you. Better look out who you're fooling with, next time."

The new boy went off brushing the dust from his clothes, sobbing, snuffling, and occasionally looking back and shaking his head and threatening what he would do to Tom the "next time he caught him out." To which Tom responded with jeers, and started off in high feather; and as soon as his back was turned the new boy snatched up a stone, threw it and hit him between the shoulders and then turned tail and ran like an antelope. Tom chased the traitor home, and thus found out where he lived. He then held a position at the gate for some time, daring the enemy to come outside, but the enemy only made faces at him through the window and declined. At last the enemy's mother

appeared, and called Tom a bad, vicious, vulgar child, and ordered him away. So he went away; but he said he "lowed" to "lay" for that boy.

He got home pretty late, that night, and when he climbed cautiously in at the window, he uncovered an ambuscade, in the person of his aunt; and when she saw the state his clothes were in her resolution to turn his Saturday holiday into captivity at hard labor became adamantine in its firmness.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Recenzii

 • "This classic story will stay with you through life, and always remind you of the things that you knew were important when you first read it." --Independent
There comes a time in every boy's life when when he has a raging desire to go somewhere and dig for hidden treasure'. Impish, daring young Tom Sawyer is a hero to his friends and a torment to his relations. For wherever there is mischief or adventure, Tom is at the heart of it. During one hot summer, Tom witnesses a murder, runs away to be a pirate, attends his own funeral, rescues an innocent man from the gallows, searches for treasure in a haunted house, foils a devilish plot and discovers a box of gold. But can he escape his nemesis, the villainous Injun Joe? BACKSTORY: Find out some fascinating facts about the author and have a go at a game of marbles!

- "This classic story will stay with you through life, and always remind you of the things that you knew were important when you first read it." --"Independent"

This classic story will stay with you through life, and always remind you of the things that you knew were important when you first read it Independent Whet juvenile appetites with Tom, his entrepreneurial spirit and his taste for treasure-hunting adventure. A paean to true boyhood Guardian The language is hard to begin with but the hero is one of the most endearing in literature -- Michael Morpurgo Daily Telegraph Twain had a gift for reliving the innermost feelings of growing up, the insecurity, fears and hopes that lie beneath the swagger that young boys maintain. He turned them into literature Daily Mail

Cuprins

Pearson English Readers bring language learning to life through the joy of reading.

Well-written stories entertain us, make us think, and keep our interest page after page. Pearson English Readers offer teenage and adult learners a huge range of titles, all featuring carefully graded language to make them accessible to learners of all abilities.

Through the imagination of some of the world's greatest authors, the English language comes to life in pages of our Readers. Students have the pleasure and satisfaction of reading these stories in English, and at the same time develop a broader vocabulary, greater comprehension and reading fluency, improved grammar, and greater confidence and ability to express themselves.

Find out more at english.com/readers