Cantitate/Preț
Produs

Not Hollywood: Independent Film at the Twilight of the American Dream

De (autor)
Notă GoodReads:
en Limba Engleză Paperback – 27 Feb 2013
The pioneering anthropologist Sherry B. Ortner combines her trademark ethnographic expertise with critical film interpretation to explore the independent film scene in New York and Los Angeles since the late 1980s. Not Hollywood is both a study of the lived experience of that scene and a critical examination of America as seen through the lenses of independent filmmakers. Based on interviews with scores of directors and producers, Ortner reveals the culture and practices of indie filmmaking, including the conviction of those involved that their films, unlike Hollywood movies, are "telling the truth" about American life. These films often illuminate the dark side of American society through narratives about the family, the economy, and politics in today's neoliberal era. Offering insightful interpretations of many of these films, Ortner argues that during the past three decades independent American cinema has functioned as a vital form of cultural critique.
Citește tot Restrânge

Preț: 14579 lei

Preț vechi: 16421 lei
-11%

Puncte Express: 219

Preț estimativ în valută:
2819 3359$ 2417£

Carte disponibilă

Livrare economică 22-28 iulie
Livrare express 07-15 iulie pentru 4684 lei

Preluare comenzi: 021 569.72.76

Specificații

ISBN-13: 9780822354260
ISBN-10: 0822354268
Pagini: 331
Ilustrații: 3 tables
Dimensiuni: 155 x 231 x 23 mm
Greutate: 0.48 kg
Editura: Duke University Press

Recenzii

"An original interpretation of film and public culture that addresses the nexus of anthropology and film studies. Best suited for anthropologists interested in contemporary visual culture and film professionals looking for perspective outside the film industry."--Robin Chin Roemer, Library Journal

"There is much information to be gained from Ortner’s expert use of anthropological methodology to explore the culture of the culture of independent cinema. Film scholars are often too close to their material to obtain findings anywhere near as striking and engaging as the ones enumerated in this volume."--Daniel Coffey, ForeWord Reviews

"Not Hollywood does what compelling ethnographies do: it helps us better understand the human complexities of something we simplistically thought we already knew. As a result, the Sundance 'scene' documented here sometimes feels like 'The Emperor’s New Clothes' and, at other times, like truly engaged progressive politics and effective cultural critique. Required reading in film and media studies, but relevant far beyond those fields."—John Thornton Caldwell, author of Production Culture: Industrial Reflexivity and Critical Practice in Film and Television

"Once again, Sherry B. Ortner takes us on an exploratory trip to an unexpected place: this time it's the 'media world' of American independent filmmakers. She reveals the cultural and emotional logics of passion, independence, and creativity that drive Gen X cineastes to max out their credit cards and push their friendships to the limit to create their own compelling visions of American life in films that are definitively 'not Hollywood.' Ortner never compromises her theoretical arguments, yet her clear and entertaining writing style makes this highly original book accessible to readers in anthropology, media and film studies, and American studies, as well as the interested public."—Faye Ginsburg, Director, Center for Media, Culture, and History, New York University

"Turning a sharp anthropologist's eye on a surprising subject, Sherry B. Ortner does for American independent film what Clifford Geertz did for Bali. Her outsider perspective allows her to raise and answer questions that most filmmakers, film historians, and audiences don't know exist."—Peter Biskind, author of Down and Dirty Pictures: Miramax, Sundance, and the Rise of Independent Filment Film


"An original interpretation of film and public culture that addresses the nexus of anthropology and film studies. Best suited for anthropologists interested in contemporary visual culture and film professionals looking for perspective outside the film industry."--Robin Chin Roemer, Library Journal "There is much information to be gained from Ortner's expert use of anthropological methodology to explore the culture of the culture of independent cinema. Film scholars are often too close to their material to obtain findings anywhere near as striking and engaging as the ones enumerated in this volume."--Daniel Coffey, ForeWord Reviews "Not Hollywood does what compelling ethnographies do: it helps us better understand the human complexities of something we simplistically thought we already knew. As a result, the Sundance 'scene' documented here sometimes feels like 'The Emperor's New Clothes' and, at other times, like truly engaged progressive politics and effective cultural critique. Required reading in film and media studies, but relevant far beyond those fields." - John Thornton Caldwell, author of Production Culture: Industrial Reflexivity and Critical Practice in Film and Television "Once again, Sherry B. Ortner takes us on an exploratory trip to an unexpected place: this time it's the 'media world' of American independent filmmakers. She reveals the cultural and emotional logics of passion, independence, and creativity that drive Gen X cineastes to max out their credit cards and push their friendships to the limit to create their own compelling visions of American life in films that are definitively 'not Hollywood.' Ortner never compromises her theoretical arguments, yet her clear and entertaining writing style makes this highly original book accessible to readers in anthropology, media and film studies, and American studies, as well as the interested public." - Faye Ginsburg, Director, Center for Media, Culture, and History, New York University "Turning a sharp anthropologist's eye on a surprising subject, Sherry B. Ortner does for American independent film what Clifford Geertz did for Bali. Her outsider perspective allows her to raise and answer questions that most filmmakers, film historians, and audiences don't know exist." - Peter Biskind, author of Down and Dirty Pictures: Miramax, Sundance, and the Rise of Independent Filment Film

Notă biografică

Sherry B. Ortner is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at UCLA. She is the author of numerous books including "New Jersey Dreaming: Capital, Culture, and the Class of '58" and "Anthropology and Social Theory: Culture, Power, and the Acting Subject," both published by Duke University Press.