Cantitate/Preț
Produs

How Not to Be Wrong: The Hidden Maths of Everyday Life (Gates Notes - Cărți recomandate de Bill Gates)

De (autor)
Notă GoodReads:
en Limba Engleză Carte Paperback – 26 May 2015

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER
The maths we learn in school can seem like an abstract set of rules, laid down by the ancients and not to be questioned. In fact, Jordan Ellenberg shows us, maths touches on everything we do, and a little mathematical knowledge reveals the hidden structures that lie beneath the world's messy and chaotic surface. In How Not to be Wrong, Ellenberg explores the mathematician's method of analyzing life, from the everyday to the cosmic, showing us which numbers to defend, which ones to ignore, and when to change the equation entirely. Along the way, he explains calculus in a single page, describes Gödel's theorem using only one-syllable words, and reveals how early you actually need to get to the airport.

Citește tot Restrânge
Toate formatele și edițiile
Toate formatele și edițiile Preț Express
Carte Paperback (2) 5504 lei  Economic 17-28 zile +1232 lei  4-8 zile
  Penguin Books – 26 May 2015 5504 lei  Economic 17-28 zile +1232 lei  4-8 zile
  Penguin Books – 26 May 2015 6696 lei  Economic 16-22 zile +637 lei  4-8 zile
Carte Hardback (1) 13605 lei  Economic 2-4 săpt. +1076 lei  11-21 zile
  Penguin Press – 29 May 2014 13605 lei  Economic 2-4 săpt. +1076 lei  11-21 zile

Din seria Gates Notes - Cărți recomandate de Bill Gates

Preț: 5504 lei

Preț vechi: 6145 lei
-10%

Puncte Express: 83

Preț estimativ în valută:
1101 1227$ 967£

Carte disponibilă

Livrare economică 07-18 iunie
Livrare express 25-29 mai pentru 2231 lei

Preluare comenzi: 021 569.72.76

Specificații

ISBN-13: 9780718196042
ISBN-10: 071819604X
Pagini: 480
Dimensiuni: 132 x 198 x 22 mm
Greutate: 0.33 kg
Editura: Penguin Books
Colecția Penguin
Seria Gates Notes - Cărți recomandate de Bill Gates

Locul publicării: London, United Kingdom

Recenzii

Steven Strogatz, Schurman Professor of Applied Mathematics, Cornell University, and author, "The Joy of x"
"With math as with anything else, there's smart, and then there's street smart. This book will help you be both. Fans of "Freakonomics" and "The Signal and the Noise" will love Ellenberg's surprising stories, snappy writing, and brilliant lessons in numerical savvy. "How Not to Be Wrong" is sharp, funny, and right."

"Kirkus Reviews"
"The author avoids heavy jargon and relies on real-world anecdotes and basic equations and illustrations to communicate how even simple math is a powerful tool....[Ellenberg]writes that, at its core, math is a special thing and produces a feeling of understanding unattainable elsewhere: 'You feel you've reached into the universe's guts and put your hand on the wire.' Math is profound, and profoundly awesome, so we should use it well--or risk being wrong....Witty and expansive, Ellenberg's math will leave readers informed, intrigued and armed with plenty of impressive conversation starters."
"Booklist"
"Readers will indeed marvel at how often mathematics sheds unexpected light on economics (assessing the performance of investment advisors), public health (predicting the likely prevalence of obesity in 30 years), and politics (explaining why wealthy individuals vote Republican but affluent states go for Democrats). Relying on remarkably few technical formulas, Ellenberg writes with humor and verve as he repeatedly demonstrates that mathematics simply extends common sense. He manages to translate even the work of theoretical pioneers such as Cantor and Godel into the language of intelligent amateurs. The surprises that await readers include not only a discovery of the astonishing versatility of mathematical thinking but also a realization of its very real limits. Mathematics, as it turns out, simply cannot resolve the real-world ambiguities surrounding the Bush-Gore cliff-hanger of 2000, nor can it resolve the much larger question of God's existence. A bracing encounter with mathematics that matters."
Steven Pinker, Johnstone Family Professor of Psychology, Harvard University; author of "How the Mind Works"
"The title of this wonderful book explains what it adds to the honorable genre of popular writing on mathematics. Like Lewis Carroll, George Gamow, and Martin Gardner before him, Jordan Ellenberg shows how mathematics ca
"The Washington Post"
"Brilliantly engaging....Ellenberg is one of a tiny group of research mathematicians with the credentials to attempt this formidable challenge....Ellenberg hooks you from the start....Ellenberg's talent for finding real-life situations that enshrine mathematical principles would be the envy of any math teacher. He presents these in fluid succession, like courses in a fine restaurant, taking care to make each insight shine through, unencumbered by jargon or notation. Part of the sheer intellectual joy of the book is watching the author leap nimbly from topic to topic, comparing slime molds to the Bush-Gore Florida vote, criminology to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. The final effect is of one enormous mosaic unified by mathematics....Ellenberg knows he is playing the role of magician, beguiling us with amazing feats of logic, showing his prowess and that of the methods he touts."
"Kirkus Reviews"
"The author avoids heavy jargon and relies on real-world anecdotes and basic equations and illustrations to communicate how even simple math is a powerful tool....[Ellenberg]writes that, at its core, math is a special thing and produces a feeling of understanding unattainable elsewhere: 'You feel you've reached into the universe's guts and put your hand on the wire.' Math is profound, and profoundly awesome, so we should use it well--or risk being wrong....Witty and expansive, Ellenberg's math will leave readers informed, intrigued and armed with plenty of impressive conversation starters."
"Booklist"
"Readers will indeed marvel at how often mathematics sheds unexpected light on economics (assessing the performance of investment advisors), public health (predicting the likely prevalence of obesity in 30 years), and politics (explaining why wealthy individuals vote Republican but affluent states go for Democrats). Relying on remarkably few technical formulas, Ellenberg writes with humor and verve as he repeatedly demonstrates tha
Manil Suri, "The Washington Post"
"Brilliantly engaging.... Ellenberg's talent for finding real-life situations that enshrine mathematical principles would be the envy of any math teacher. He presents these in fluid succession, like courses in a fine restaurant, taking care to make each insight shine through, unencumbered by jargon or notation. Part of the sheer intellectual joy of the book is watching the author leap nimbly from topic to topic, comparing slime molds to the Bush-Gore Florida vote, criminology to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. The final effect is of one enormous mosaic unified by mathematics."
Mario Livio, "The Wall Street Journal"
"Easy-to-follow, humorously presented.... This book will help you to avoid the pitfalls that result from not having the right tools. It will help you realize that mathematical reasoning permeates our lives--that it can be, as Mr. Ellenberg writes, a kind of 'X-ray specs that reveal hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of the world.'"
Evelyn Lamb, "Scientific American"
"Witty, compelling, and just plain fun to read.... "How Not to Be Wrong" can help you explore your mathematical superpowers."
Laura Miller, Salon:
"A poet-mathematician offers an empowering and entertaining primer for the age of Big Data.... A rewarding popular math book for just about anyone."
"Nature"
"Mathematicians from Charles Lutwidge Dodgson to Steven Strogatz have celebrated the power of mathematics in life and the imagination. In this hugely enjoyable exploration of everyday maths as 'an atomic-powered prosthesis that you attach to your common sense', Jordan Ellenberg joins their ranks. Ellenberg, an academic and Slate's 'Do the Math' columnist, explains key principles with erudite gusto--whether poking holes in predictions of a US 'obesity apocalypse', or unpicking an attempt by psychologist B. F. Skinner to prove statistically that Shakespeare was a dud at alliteration."

"The New York Times"
"Lively prose....Refreshingly lucid while still remaining conceptually rigorous, this book lends insight into how mathematicians think -- and shows us how we can start to think like mathematicians as well."
Manil Suri, "The Washington Post"
"Brilliantly engaging.... Ellenberg's talent for finding real-life situations that enshrine mathematical principles would be the envy of any math teacher. He presents these in fluid succession, like courses in a fine restaurant, taking care to make each insight shine through, unencumbered by jargon or notation. Part of the sheer intellectual joy of the book is watching the author leap nimbly from topic to topic, comparing slime molds to the Bush-Gore Florida vote, criminology to Beethoven's Ninth Symphony. The final effect is of one enormous mosaic unified by mathematics."
Mario Livio, "The Wall Street Journal"
"Easy-to-follow, humorously presented.... This book will help you to avoid the pitfalls that result from not having the right tools. It will help you realize that mathematical reasoning permeates our lives--that it can be, as Mr. Ellenberg writes, a kind of 'X-ray specs that reveal hidden structures underneath the messy and chaotic surface of the world.'"
Evelyn Lamb, "Scientific American"
"Witty, compelling, and just plain fun to read.... "How Not to Be Wrong" can help you explore your mathematical superpowers."
Laura Miller, Salon:
"A poet-mathematician offers an empowering and entertaining primer for the age of Big Data.... A rewarding popular math book for just about anyone."
"Nature"
"Mathematicians from Charles Lutwidge Dodgson to Steven Strogatz have celebrated the power of mathematics in life and the imagination. In this hugely enjoyable exploration of everyday maths as 'an atomic-powered prosthesis that you attach to your common sense', Jordan Ellenberg joins their ranks. Ellenberg, an academic and Slate's 'Do the Math' columnist

Notă biografică

Jordan Ellenberg is the Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has lectured around the world on his research in number theory and delivered one of the plenary addresses at the 2013 Joint Mathematics Meetings, the largest math conference in the world. His writing has appeared in "Wired," "The New York Times," "The Washington Post," "The Wall Street Journal," "The Boston Globe," and "The Believer," and he has been featured on the "Today" show and NPR's "All Things Considered." He writes a popular column called "Do the Math" for "Slate."