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Homophobias: Lust and Loathing across Time and Space

Editat de David Murray
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en Limba Engleză Carte Paperback – 15 Mar 2010
What is it about “the homosexual” that incites vitriolic rhetoric and/or violence around the world? How and why do some people hate queers? Does homophobia operate differently across social, political, and economic terrains? Where are the ambivalences in homophobic discourses that can be exploited to undermine its hegemonic privilege? This volume addresses these questions through critical interrogations of sites where homophobic discourses are produced. It provides innovative analytical insights that expose the complex and intersecting cultural, political, and economic forces which are contributing to the development of new forms of homophobia. It is a “call to action” for anthropologists and other social scientists to examine more carefully the processes, politics, histories and contexts of places and people who profess hatred for queerness. The contributors to this volume open up the scope of inquiry into processes of homophobia, moving the analysis of a particular form of “hate” into new, wider sociocultural and political fields. The ongoing production of homophobic discourses is carefully analyzed in a diverse range of sites, past and present--American Christian churches, Greece, India, the Caribbean, New York City, Australia, and Indonesia--in order to uncover homophobias’ complex operational processes and intimate relationships to nationalism, sexism, racism, class, and colonialism. The contributors to this volume also critically inquire into the limitations of the term “homophobia” and interrogate and question its utility as a cross-cultural term.Contributors: Steven Angelides; Tom Boellstorff; Lawrence Cohen; Don Kulick; Suzanne LaFont; Martin F. Manalansan IV ; David A. B. Murray; Brian Riedel; Constance R. Sullivan-Blum
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Specificații

ISBN-13: 9780822345985
ISBN-10: 0822345986
Pagini: 227
Ilustrații: 3 illustrations
Dimensiuni: 155 x 231 x 15 mm
Greutate: 0.34 kg
Editura: Duke University Press
Colecția Duke University Press
Locul publicării: United States

Cuprins

Contents; PrefaceIntroduction: David A. B. Murray; Part 1 (Dis)placing Homophobia; 1. Can There Be an Anthropology of Homophobia?: Don Kulick; 2. Homophobia at Gay Central: Martin F. Manalansan IV; 3. “It’s Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve”: What’s at Stake in the Construction of Contemporary American Christian Homophobia: Constance R. Sullivan-Blum; 4. The Homosexualisation of Pedophilia: The Case of Alison Thorne and the Australian Pedophile Support Group: Steven Angelides; 5. Stolen Kisses: “Homophobia” as “Racism” in Contemporary Urban Greece: Brian Riedel: Part 2 Trans/national Homophobias; 6. Not Quite Redemption Song: LGBT Hate in Jamaica: Suzanne LaFont; 7. The Emergence of Political Homophobia in Indonesia: Masculinity and National Belonging: Tom Boellstorff; 8. Homo Hauntings: Spectral Sexuality and the Good Citizen in Barbadian Media: David A. B. Murray; 9. Lucknow noir: Lawrence Cohen; Epilogue: What is to be (un)done?: David A. B. MurrayBibliography

Recenzii

"This book is a splendid collection of essays edited by David A.B. Murray. The volume is the outcome of discussions first held in the mid-1990s in response to a growing cognition of the marked differences in the representation of ‘gay culture’ across ethnographic sites. The authors interrogate the notion of homophobia, demonstrating it to be a problematic category. ‘Phobias’, unlike ‘isms’ (racism, sexism), point to the ‘psychological’ rather than structural aspects of difference. As a concept, homophobia concerns anthropologists of gay and lesbian cultures. The excellent chapters explore how categories and practices of anti-homosexuality are worked out in specific contexts, from New York, to urban Greece, to LBGT hate in Jamaica." Kathleen Richardson, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute
“David A. B. Murray’s collection makes an important contribution to queer/LGBT studies by extricating and interrogating the concept of ‘homophobia’ often implicit in anthropological studies of sexuality and gender. The essays reject essentialized characterizations of homophobia as an intrinsic quality of a culture, region, or nation; in contrast, they explore the institutionally mediated, politically infused, and historically situated set of practices and discourses that constitute homophobias.”--Megan J. Sinnott, author of Toms and Dees: Transgender Identity and Female Same-Sex Relationships in Thailand

"This book is a splendid collection of essays edited by David A.B. Murray. The volume is the outcome of discussions first held in the mid-1990s in response to a growing cognition of the marked differences in the representation of 'gay culture' across ethnographic sites. The authors interrogate the notion of homophobia, demonstrating it to be a problematic category. 'Phobias', unlike 'isms' (racism, sexism), point to the 'psychological' rather than structural aspects of difference. As a concept, homophobia concerns anthropologists of gay and lesbian cultures. The excellent chapters explore how categories and practices of anti-homosexuality are worked out in specific contexts, from New York, to urban Greece, to LBGT hate in Jamaica." Kathleen Richardson, Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute "David A. B. Murray's collection makes an important contribution to queer/LGBT studies by extricating and interrogating the concept of 'homophobia' often implicit in anthropological studies of sexuality and gender. The essays reject essentialized characterizations of homophobia as an intrinsic quality of a culture, region, or nation; in contrast, they explore the institutionally mediated, politically infused, and historically situated set of practices and discourses that constitute homophobias."--Megan J. Sinnott, author of Toms and Dees: Transgender Identity and Female Same-Sex Relationships in Thailand

Notă biografică

David A. B. Murray is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Director of the Graduate Program in Women's Studies at York University in Toronto. He is the author of "Opacity: Gender, Sexuality, Race, and the "Problem" of Identity in Martinique."