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Future Challenges in Evaluating and Managing Sustainable Development in the Built Environment

Editat de Peter S. Brandon, Patrizia Lombardi, Geoffrey Q. Shen
Notă GoodReads:
en Limba Engleză Carte Hardback – 07 Apr 2017
Sustainable development has seen considerable progress, to the point where evaluation, measurement and assessment play a signi cant role in what is now termed Sustainability Science. As this trend continues, then increased precision and structure in the capture of knowledge will be required. While the emphasis on environmental sustainability will continue, it is likely that increased focus on the balance between physical occurrences and the behaviour patterns of life will be required, as their interdependencies can and do lead to unintended consequences where these relationships are not understood or thought through. The objective of this book is to stimulate and reinterpret the demands of responsible and sustainable development in the built environment for future action and development. It considers the methods of evaluation, the use of technology, the creation of new models and the role of human factors for examining and developing sustainable development over the next 20 years.
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Specificații

ISBN-13: 9781119190714
ISBN-10: 1119190711
Pagini: 368
Dimensiuni: 181 x 250 x 22 mm
Greutate: 0.86 kg
Editura: Wiley
Locul publicării: Chichester, United Kingdom

Public țintă

The main market will be postgraduate students taking both taught and research degrees, and researchers at postdoctoral level and above. There will be a practitioner market, mainly architects, planners & surveyors, and policy makers.

Textul de pe ultima copertă

Sustainable development has seen considerable progress, to the point where evaluation, measurement and assessment play a signi cant role in what is now termed Sustainability Science. As this trend continues, then increased precision and structure in the capture of knowledge will be required. While the emphasis on environmental sustainability will continue, it is likely that increased focus on the balance between physical occurrences and the behaviour patterns of life will be required, as their interdependencies can and do lead to unintended consequences where these relationships are not understood or thought through. The objective of this book is to stimulate and reinterpret the demands of responsible and sustainable development in the built environment for future action and development. It considers the methods of evaluation, the use of technology, the creation of new models and the role of human factors for examining and developing sustainable development over the next 20 years.

Cuprins

List of Contributors x
Acknowledgements xii

1 Initiative and Obsolescence in Sustainable Development
1
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 Section 1: World views and values 3
1.3 Section 2: Design and evaluation tools and technology 5
1.4 Section 3: Engaging with practice, stakeholders and management 8
1.5 Initiative and obsolescence 10
1.6 Final statement 13
References 13
 
Section 1: World Views and Values 15
2 Cities of Tomorrow: Five Crucibles of Change 17
2.1 Exordium 17
2.2 Disquisition 20
2.3 Propositum 36
References 39

3 Going Beyond Sustainability: Changing Views, Changing Ways 40

3.1 Introduction 40
3.2 What lies beyond sustainability? 41
3.3 Changing views: Transforming story, transforming thought 44
3.4 Changing self: Transforming knowledge into wisdom 48
3.5 Changing ways: Transforming practice 50
3.6 Conclusions 52
Acknowledgements 53
References 54
 
4 Transition Towards a Post Carbon City Does Resilience Matter? 55
4.2 Cities and climate change 57
4.3 Approaches to sustainable development 60
4.4 Concluding remarks 65
Acknowledgements 66
References 67

5 Sustainable Urban Development Where Are You Now? 69
5.1 Introduction 69
5.2 Establishing the BEQUEST network 70
5.3 Building the BEQUEST team 70
5.4 The legacy of BEQUEST 73
5.5 Defining SUD 75
5.6 The diffusion of SUD 77
5.7 The framing of and tools for SUD 78
5.8 Expansion/dilution of SUD 80
5.9 Elaborating, not extending, SUD 81
5.10 Conclusions 83
References 86

Section 2: Design and Evaluation Tools and Technology 91
6 Crowdsourcing Public Participation in Sustainable
Built Environment Development: The Democratisation of Expertise 93
6.1 Introduction 93
6.2 The context of sustainable built environment development 94
6.3 Background to technology enabled public participation 96
6.4 The potential of virtual reality 98
6.5 Using virtual reality as a crowdsourcing approach to public participation in urban planning 101
6.6 Summary 103
References 104

7 2050 The Invisible Future 108
7.1 The future 108
7.2 What future? 109
7.3 The present and the future 111
7.4 Future city in 2050 112
7.5 Invisible BIM 2050 120
7.6 Constraints to the vision 122
References 123

8 The Role of Carbon in Sustainable Development 125
8.1 Introduction 125
8.2 Operational and embodied carbon in construction 126
8.3 Estimating OC and EC 129
8.4 Shifting of focus 140
8.5 Drivers and barriers in managing carbon emissions in construction 144
8.6 Need for carbon estimating in construction 148
8.7 Future trends 149
8.8 Conclusions 150
Acknowledgements 151
References 151

9 Supporting Risk Assessment in Building Resilient Cities 155
9.1 Introduction 155
9.2 Theoretical framework for capturing the degree of vulnerability of a place 156
9.3 Local risk assessment process 156
9.4 Multi agency collaboration and community engagement 158
9.5 Technology platforms for interactive risk assessment 159
9.6 Conclusion 161
References 161

10 Towards an Intelligent Digital Ecosystem Sustainable Data driven Design Futures 164
10.1 Introduction 164
10.2 Changing role of design for sustainable futures 165
10.3 Emerging concepts, challenges and trends 165
10.4 The rise of big data 167
10.5 From green to smart: New focus/new metrics 168
10.6 Predicted versus actual performance 169
10.7 Towards a digital ecosystem Scenarios for implementation 173
10.8 Conclusions: Future value propositions 176
References 177

11 Smart Cities Case Study The Nottingham Experience 179
11.1 Background 179
11.2 Remourban 180
11.3 Nottingham case study 181
11.4 Integrated infrastructures 189
11.5 Discussion on added value 190
References 191

Section 3: Engaging with Practice, Stakeholders and Management 193
12 Value oriented Stakeholder Engagement in Sustainable Development: A Conceptual Framework 195
12.1 Stakeholder engagement in sustainable development 195
12.2 Approaches to stakeholder engagement 196
12.3 Value oriented approach of stakeholder engagement in sustainable development 198
12.4 Process of the value oriented stakeholder engagement approach 201
12.5 Using SNA to analyse stakeholder interrelationships 202
12.6 The conceptual framework and its potential applications 208
12.7 Conclusions 208
Acknowledgements 210
References 210

13 Sustainability in Practice in the United Kingdom A Reflective Analysis 213
13.1 Introduction 213
13.2 Method 215
13.3 Reflective analysis 215
13.4 Property Tectonics 215
13.5 Economics, investment and finance 217
13.6 National grid pressures 218
13.7 Waste recycling 219
13.8 Lifespan software 220
13.9 Energy management in social housing 221
13.10 Energy Company Obligation 226
13.11 Compliance and warranties 226
13.12 Conclusion 229
References 229


14 Understanding Value Generation in Complex Urban

Regeneration Projects 231
14.1 The context: Social housing projects in Brazil 231
14.2 Management of urban regeneration projects 232
14.3 Value generation 233
14.4 Research method 235
14.5 Main results 237
14.6 Discussion and conclusions 248
References 250

15 Integrating Sustainable Urban Development 252
15.1 Problem realisation 252
15.2 Towards a solution 254
15.3 Globalisation and virtualisation 256
15.4 The city and its hinterland 257
15.5 Towards better governance structures 261
15.6 Mind the skills gap 263
References 266
Further reading 266

16 Sustainability The Role of Construction Contracts 268
16.1 Introduction 268
16.2 The JCT consultation 271
16.3 Specification or contract conditions 273
16.4 JCT standard form contracts and sustainability 276
16.5 The framework objectives 276
16.6 The provider s supply chain 276
16.7 Sustainable development and environmental considerations 277
16.8 Aspirational or legally binding provisions 278
16.9 The future 281
16.10 Conclusion 282
References 284

17 Transforming Communication and Decision making Practices for Sustainable Renewal of Urban Transport Infrastructure 285
17.1 Introduction 285
17.2 Aim, objectives and methods of study 287
17.3 Sustainable renewal of urban transport infrastructure 288
17.4 Analysis of key issues in urban transport renewal 292
17.5 Findings and discussion 298
17.6 Conclusion 300
References 301

18 Rethinking the Role of Time in Sustainable Urban Development 306
18.1 Introduction 306
18.2 Why time? 307
18.3 Planning with time 308
18.4 Time as a linking factor. Hermann Dooyeweerd s philosophy of the law idea 312
18.5 The grave of time. Why current planning approaches fail 314
18.6 Summary 316
18.7 A future challenge 316
References 317

19 Suggestions for Future Sustainability: Philosophical and Practical 319
19.1 Sustainability 319
19.2 Dooyeweerd s philosophy 323
19.3 The longer view 333
19.4 The importance of attitudes and beliefs to sustainability 336
19.5 Conclusion 341
References 342
Index 344

Notă biografică

The Editors
Peter S. Brandon is Professor Emeritus at the University of Salford, UK, having been Head of School and Pro Vice Chancellor for Research. He has chaired many of the major research committees related to the Built Environment in the UK, including the 1996 and 2001 Research Assessment Exercises.
Patrizia Lombardi is Full Professor and Head of the Interuniversity Department of Urban and Regional Studies and Planning at the Politecnico di Turin, Italy. She has been an established gure in the eld of evaluating sustainable urban development for over 25 years, publishing widely in the subject area and coordinating several pan–European projects.
Geoffrey Q. Shen is Chair Professor of Construction Management and became Associate Dean of the Faculty of Construction and Environment of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China, after completing two terms as Head of the Department of Building and Real Estate. He has a proven track record of research leadership in collaborative working and sustainable urban development.