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Compendium of Hydrogen Energy: Hydrogen Storage, Distribution and Infrastructure (Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy)

Editat de Ram Gupta, Angelo Basile, T. Nejat Veziroglu
Notă GoodReads:
en Limba Engleză Carte Hardback – 21 Aug 2015
Compendium of Hydrogen Energy, Volume 2: Hydrogen Storage, Distribution and Infrastructure focuses on the storage and transmission of hydrogen. As many experts believe the hydrogen economy will, at some point, replace the fossil fuel economy as the primary source of the world’s energy, this book details hydrogen storage in pure form, including chapters on hydrogen liquefaction, slush production, as well as underground and pipeline storage.
Other sections in the book explore physical and chemical storage, including environmentally sustainable methods of hydrogen production from water, with final chapters dedicated to hydrogen distribution and infrastructure.


  • Covers a wide array of methods for storing hydrogen, detailing hydrogen transport and the infrastructure required for transition to the hydrogen economy
  • Written by leading academics in the fields of sustainable energy and experts from the world of industry
  • Part of a very comprehensive compendium which looks at the entirety of the hydrogen energy economy
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Specificații

ISBN-13: 9781782423621
ISBN-10: 1782423621
Pagini: 438
Dimensiuni: 152 x 229 x 25 mm
Greutate: 0.82 kg
Editura: ELSEVIER SCIENCE
Seria Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy


Public țintă

Academic researchers and postgraduate students working in the area of the hydrogen storage and transmission, R&D managers in power generation companies studying next generation fuels, academic researchers and postgraduate students working in the wider area of the hydrogen economy.

Cuprins

  • List of contributors
  • Part One: Hydrogen storage in pure form
    • 1: Introduction to hydrogen storage
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Physical storage
      • 1.3 Material-based hydrogen storage
    • 2: Hydrogen liquefaction and liquid hydrogen storage
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 2.1 Introduction: Why liquefying hydrogen?
      • 2.2 Basics of cryogenic liquefaction
      • 2.3 Hydrogen thermodynamic properties at ambient and low temperatures
      • 2.4 Large-scale hydrogen liquefaction and storage
      • 2.5 Advantages and disadvantages
      • 2.6 Current uses of liquid hydrogen
      • 2.7 Sources of further information and advice
    • 3: Slush hydrogen production, storage, and transportation
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction: What is slush hydrogen?
      • 3.2 Hydrogen energy system using slush hydrogen
      • 3.3 Thermophysical properties of slush hydrogen
      • 3.4 Process of producing and storing slush hydrogen
      • 3.5 Density and mass flow meters for slush hydrogen
      • 3.6 Advantages and disadvantages of transporting slush hydrogen via pipeline
      • 3.7 Uses of stored slush and liquid hydrogen
      • 3.8 Conclusions
      • 3.9 Future trends
      • 3.10 Sources of future information and advice
      • Appendix A Production
      • Appendix B Flow and heat transfer
      • Appendix C Measurement instrumentation
    • 4: Underground and pipeline hydrogen storage
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 4.1 Underground hydrogen storage as an element of energy cycle
      • 4.2 Scientific problems related to UHS
      • 4.3 Biochemical transformations of underground hydrogen
      • 4.4 Hydrodynamic losses of H2 in UHS
      • 4.5 Other problems
      • 4.6 Pipeline storage of hydrogen
  • Part Two: Physical and chemical storage of hydrogen
    • 5: Cryo-compressed hydrogen storage
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Thermodynamics and kinetics of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage
      • 5.3 Performance of onboard storage system
      • 5.4 Well-to-tank efficiency
      • 5.5 Assessment of cryo-compressed hydrogen storage and outlook
    • 6: Adsorption of hydrogen on carbon nanostructure
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 General considerations for physisorption of hydrogen on carbon nanostructures
      • 6.3 Carbon nanotubes and fullerenes
      • 6.4 Activated carbons
      • 6.5 Layered graphene nanostructures
      • 6.6 Zeolite-templated carbons
      • 6.7 Conclusion
    • 7: Metal–organic frameworks for hydrogen storage
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Synthetic considerations
      • 7.3 Cryo-temperature hydrogen storage at low and high pressures
      • 7.4 Room temperature hydrogen storage at high pressure
      • 7.5 Nanoconfinement of chemical hydrides in MOFs
      • 7.6 Conclusions and future trends
    • 8: Other methods for the physical storage of hydrogen
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Storage of compressed hydrogen in glass microcontainers
      • 8.3 Hydrogen physisorption in porous materials
      • 8.4 Hydrogen hydrate clathrates
      • 8.5 Conclusions and outlook
    • 9: Use of carbohydrates for hydrogen storage
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Converting carbohydrates to hydrogen by SyPaB
      • 9.3 Challenges of carbohydrates as hydrogen storage and respective solutions
      • 9.4 Future carbohydrate-to-hydrogen systems
      • 9.5 Conclusions
      • 9.6 Sources of future information and advice
    • 10: Conceptual density functional theory (DFT) approach to all-metal aromaticity and hydrogen storage
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Background of conceptual DFT
      • 10.3 All-metal aromaticity
      • 10.4 Role of aromaticity in hydrogen storage
      • 10.5 Case studies of possible hydrogen-storage materials with the aid of CDFT
      • 10.6 Future trends
  • Part Three: Hydrogen distribution and infrastructure
    • 11: Introduction to hydrogen transportation
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Overview of methods for hydrogen transportation
      • 11.3 Difficulties involved with the transportation of hydrogen
      • 11.4 Future trends
      • 11.5 Sources of further information and advice
    • 12: Hydrogen transportation by pipelines
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Current hydrogen pipelines
      • 12.3 Principles of transportation of hydrogen
      • 12.4 Gas transportation principles
      • 12.5 Pipeline transportation of hydrogen gas
      • 12.6 Conclusion
      • 12.7 Future trends
      • 12.8 Further reading
    • 13: Progress in hydrogen energy infrastructure development—addressing technical and institutional barriers
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Recent progress in hydrogen infrastructure in the United States
      • 13.3 Recent progress in hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicle and fuel cell bus demonstrations in China
      • 13.4 Conclusions
    • 14: Designing optimal infrastructures for delivering hydrogen to consumers
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Building blocks of hydrogen infrastructure
      • 14.3 Review of hydrogen infrastructure models
      • 14.4 Case study: Decarbonizing UK transport demand with hydrogen vehicles
      • 14.5 Results
      • 14.6 Conclusions
      • Appendix
    • 15: Investment in the infrastructure for hydrogen passenger cars—New hype or reality?
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Uncertainties surrounding the investment in hydrogen infrastructure
      • 15.3 Implementation of the early infrastructure: case studies
      • 15.4 Future trends
      • 15.5 Conclusions
      • 15.6 Sources of further information and advice
  • Index