15 cărți clasice pe care trebuie să le citești

Ca să poți spune că ești un cititor pasionat trebuie să ai un „palmares” de cărți savurate. Și nu orice cărți. Nu ai voie să nu parcurgi cel puțin o dată cărțile din literatura clasică. Acestea sunt precum parfumul, mirosul lor te poartă în trecut și ești brusc înconjurat de amintiri. Cel mai intens sentiment este atunci când citești o carte cât ești încă în brațele copilăriei și o recitești la maturitate, când mentalitatea se schimbă, perspectiva asupra vieții este cu totul alta, iar rațiunea îți este schimbată de circumstanțe.  Când vrei să te îndepărtezi de stilul modern, de ficțiunea repetitivă ce se regăsește în lucrările scriitorilor contemporani, îți recomand să te afunzi în lecturarea sau relecturarea clasicilor pentru că vei fi surprins.

1. The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath (1961): “I felt my lungs inflate with the onrush of scenery—air, mountains, trees, people. I thought, “This is what it is to be happy.”

“That’s one of the reasons I never wanted to get married. The last thing I wanted was infinite security and to be the place an arrow shoots off from. I wanted change and excitement and to shoot off in all directions myself, like the colored arrows from a Fourth of July rocket.”

“I felt very still and empty, the way the eye of a tornado must feel, moving dully along in the middle of the surrounding hullabaloo.”

2. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell (1936):“Well, my dear, take heart. Some day, I will kiss you and you will like it. But not now, so I beg you not to be too impatient.”

“Perhaps – I want the old days back again and they’ll never come back, and I am haunted by the memory of them and of the world falling about my ears. ”

“Dear Scarlett! You aren’t helpless. Anyone as selfish and determined as you are is never helpless. God help the Yankees if they should get you.” -Rhett Butler”

3. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne (1850):“Love, whether newly born or aroused from a deathlike slumber, must always create sunshine, filling the heart so full of radiance, that it overflows upon the outward world.”

“She wanted—what some people want throughout life—a grief that should deeply touch her, and thus humanize and make her capable of sympathy.”

“It [the scarlet letter] had the effect of a spell, taking her out of the ordinary relations with humanity, and enclosing her in a sphere by herself.”

4. 1984 by George Orwell (1949): “He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.”

“Until they became conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious.”

“Power is in tearing human minds to pieces and putting them together again in new shapes of your own choosing.”

5. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D Salinger (1951): “What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn’t happen much, though.”

“It’s funny. All you have to do is say something nobody understands and they’ll do practically anything you want them to.”

6. Animal Farm by George Orwell (1949): “Man is the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run fast enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself.”

“The only good human being is a dead one.”

“This work was strictly voluntary, but any animal who absented himself from it would have his rations reduced by half.”

7. Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte (1847): “If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger.”

“He’s more myself than I am. Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same.”

“It is hard to forgive, and to look at those eyes, and feel those wasted hands,’ he answered. ‘Kiss me again; and don’t let me see your eyes! I forgive what you have done to me. I love my murderer—but yours! How can I?”

8. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott (1868): “I’ve got the key to my castle in the air, but whether I can unlock the door remains to be seen.”

“…for love casts out fear, and gratitude can conquer pride.”

“I want to do something splendid…something heroic or wonderful that won’t be forgotten after I’m dead. I don’t know what, but I’m on the watch for it and mean to astonish you all someday.”

9. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck (1937): “His ear heard more than what was said to him, and his slow speech had overtones not of thought, but of understanding beyond thought.”

“Just like heaven. Ever’body wants a little piece of lan’. I read plenty of books out here. Nobody never gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land. It’s just in their head. They’re all the time talkin’ about it, but it’s jus’ in their head.”

10. To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee (1960): “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view… Until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.”

“I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know you’re licked before you begin, but you begin anyway and see it through no matter what.

11. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad (1899): “We live as we dream–alone….”

“I don’t like work–no man does–but I like what is in the work–the chance to find yourself. Your own reality–for yourself not for others–what no other man can ever know. They can only see the mere show, and never can tell what it really means.”

“Your strength is just an accident owed to the weakness of others.”

12. Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy (1891): “A strong woman who recklessly throws away her strength, she is worse than a weak woman who has never had any strength to throw away.”

“Ladies know what to guard against, because they read novels that tell them of these tricks…”

“The beauty or ugliness of a character lay not only in its achievements, but in its aims and impulses; its true history lay, not among things done, but among things willed.”

13. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925): “I hope she’ll be a fool — that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.”

“The loneliest moment in someone’s life is when they are watching their whole world fall apart, and all they can do is stare blankly.”

“And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.”

14. Lord of the Flies by William Golding (1954): “Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man’s heart, and the fall through the air of the true, wise friend called Piggy.”

“The greatest ideas are the simplest.”

“We’ve got to have rules and obey them. After all, we’re not savages. We’re English, and the English are best at everything.”

15. The Glass Castle by Jeanette Walls (2005): “Things usually work out in the end.”
“What if they don’t?”
“That just means you haven’t come to the end yet.”

“You should never hate anyone, even your worst enemies. Everyone has something good about them. You have to find the redeeming quality and love the person for that.”

“Life is a drama full of tragedy and comedy. You should learn to enjoy the comic episodes a little more.”

Author: Katia

Iubesc poezia, ador culorile și îmi place să împletesc într-un mod melodios cuvintele. Sunt pasionată de istorie și literatură și fac tot ce îmi stă în putință să fiu cât mai aproape de ele. Citatul care mă reprezintă este: "Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited. Imagination encircles the world."(A. Einstein)

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