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A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian (Penguin Essentials, nr. 71)

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Notă GoodReads:
en Limba Engleză Paperback – June 2017
A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian is bestselling author Marina Lewycka's hilarious and award winning debut novel, now available as a Penguin Essential for the first time.

'Two years after my mother died, my father fell in love with a glamorous blonde Ukrainian divorcée. He was eighty-four and she was thirty-six. She exploded into our lives like a fluffy pink grenade, churning up the murky water, bringing to the surface a sludge of sloughed-off memories, giving the family ghosts a kick up the backside.'

Sisters Vera and Nadezhda must aside a lifetime of feuding to save their émigré engineer father from voluptuous gold-digger Valentina. With her proclivity for green satin underwear and boil-in-the-bag cuisine, she will stop at nothing in her pursuit of Western wealth.

But the sisters' campaign to oust Valentina unearths family secrets, uncovers fifty years of Europe's darkest history and sends them back to roots they'd much rather forget . . .

'It's rare to find a first novel that gets so much right . . . Lewycka is a seriously talented comic writer' Time Out

'Hugely enjoyable . . . yields a golden harvest of family truths' Daily Telegraph

'Delightful, funny, touching' Spectator

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Specificații

ISBN-13: 9780241981443
ISBN-10: 0241981441
Pagini: 336
Ilustrații: no pictures
Dimensiuni: 111 x 181 x 20 mm
Greutate: 0.18 kg
Editura: Penguin Books
Colecția Penguin
Seria Penguin Essentials

Locul publicării: London, United Kingdom

Notă biografică

Marina Lewycka was born in Kiel, Germany at the end of the war and grew up in England. Her novels Two Caravans and We Are All Made of Glue are available in Penguin now.

Recenzii

It's rare to find a first novel that gets so much right . . . Lewycka is a seriously talented comic writer

More than just a jolly romp with political undertones is the way it captures the peculiar flavour of Eastern European immigrant life . . . a very rich mixture indeed, as well as very enjoyable reading
Funny, gritty, original ... one I adore
Remarkable, a lovely novel
An extraordinary read . . . nothing short of amazing. A rare treat, all too easy to gulp down in one greedy sitting
Outstanding
Extremely funny
Intelligent, lively, well written and compassionate
Ploughs a rich comic furrow
A clever, touching story
Mad and hilarious
Hilarious
A delightful first novel . . . an understanding of history, a profundity, and yet a lightness of touch, that are a joy... funny and touching
Hugely enjoyable . . . yields a golden harvest of family truths
Memorably inventive, unexpectedly moving
Wit, humour, sparkling dialogue, vivid characterization and generous spirit. Food for thought and a great read
Enthralling
Thought-provoking, uproariously funny, a comic feast. A riotous oil painting of senility, lust and greed
A delightful first novel . . . an understanding of history, a profundity, and yet a lightness of touch, that are a joy . . . funny, touching and completely convincing

Cuprins

Introduction and Overview; B.Guha-Khasnobis & G.Mavrotas
Sources and Effectiveness of Financial Development: What We Know and What We Need to Know; P.Demetriades & S.Andrianova
The Poverty Macroeconomic Policy Nexus: Some Short-Run Analytics; G.Mavrotas & S.M.Murshed
Finance and Poverty in Ethiopia: A Household Level Analysis; A.Geda, A.Shimeles & D.Zerfu
Financial Sector Development, Savings Mobilization and Poverty Reduction in Ghana; P.Quartey
Finance and Growth: An Empirical Assessment of the Indian Economy; P.K.Das & B.Guha-Khasnobis
The Impact of Financial Openness on Economic Integration: Evidence from Europe and the CIS; F.Carmignani & A.Chowdhury
Does Financial Liberalization Influence Saving, Investment and Growth? Evidence from 25 Emerging Market Economies, 1973-1996; N.Hermes & R.Lensink
The Corporate Debt Market in India: An Analytical Study of Macroeconomic and Institutional Issues; B.Guha-Khasnobis & S.Kar
Financial Markets and R&D Investments: A Discrete Time Model to Interpret Public Policies; M.Mazzoli
Financial Sector Development and Total Factor Productivity Growth; S.Kumbhakar & G.Mavrotas
The Effects of Regional Integration: Impact on Real Effective Exchange Rate Volatility, Institutional Quality and Growth for MENA Countries; L.Becchetti & I.Hasan

Extras

1. Two phone calls and a funeral
Two years after my mother died, my father fell in love with a glamorous blonde Ukrainian divorcee. He was eighty-four and she was thirty-six. She exploded into our lives like a fluffy pink grenade, churning up the murky water, bringing to the surface a sludge of sloughed-off memories, giving the family ghosts a kick up the backside.
It all started with a phone call.
My father’s voice, quavery with excitement, crackles down the line.
“Good news, Nadezhda. I’m getting married!”
I remember the rush of blood to my head. Please let it be a joke! Oh, he’s gone bonkers! Oh, you foolish old man! But I don’t say any of those things.
“Oh, that’s nice, Pappa,” I say.
“Yes, yes. She is coming with her son from Ukraina. Ternopiol in Ukraina.” Ukraina: he sighs, breathing in the remembered scent of mown hay and cherry blossom. But I catch the distinct synthetic whiff of New Russia.
Her name is Valentina, he tells me. But she is more like Venus. “Botticelli’s Venus rising from waves. Golden hair. Charming eyes. Superior breasts. When you see her you will understand.”
The grown-up me is indulgent. How sweet—this last late flowering of love. The daughter me is outraged. The traitor! The randy old beast! And our mother barely two years dead. I am angry and curious. I can’t wait to see her—this woman who is usurping my mother.
“She sounds gorgeous. When can I meet her?”
“After marriage you can meet.”
“I think it might be better if we could meet her first, don’t you?”
“Why you want to meet? You not marrying her.” (He knows something’s not quite right, but he thinks he can get away with it.)
“But Pappa, have you really thought this through? It seems very sudden. I mean, she must be a lot younger than you.”
I modulate my voice carefully, to conceal any signs of disapproval, like a worldly-wise adult dealing with a love struck adolescent.
“Thirty-six. She’s thirty-six and I’m eighty four. So what?” (He pronounces it ‘vat.’)
There is a snap in his voice. He has anticipated this question.
“Well, it’s quite an age difference...”
“Nadezhda, I never thought you would be so bourgeois.” (He puts the emphasis on the last syllable - wah!)
“No, no.” He has me on the defensive. “It’s just that…;there could be problems.”
There will be no problems, says Pappa. He has anticipated all problems. He has known her for three months.